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College and Career Readiness through Blended Learning

- Authored by: Greg Cunningham

Red Sox Honor a JFY Student. Collaboration with Bridgewater State and Durfee High leads to a 4-year scholarship.

by Greg Cunningham

Collaboration with Bridgewater State and Durfee High leads to a 4-year scholarship

On Saturday, June 26 the Red Sox beat the Yankees 4-2, but the high point of the evening was a pre-game ceremony honoring this year’s Red Sox Scholars. One of the honorees standing on the hallowed turf was Habiba Haji, who graduated from Durfee High School in Fall River after transferring from John D. O’Bryant in Boston. Habiba was a student in JFYNetWorksdual enrollment program at Durfee with Bridgewater State University.

There Comes a Time We Must Come Together, WE Are The World

by Greg Cunningham

The world must come together

“Check your egos at the door.”

This sign, inscribed by Quincy Jones, greeted 46 world-famous singers who showed up  at the A&M Studios in Los Angeles the night of January 28, 1985, to record We Are the World for USA For Africa to raise money for famine relief in Ethiopia. A drought of a magnitude never seen in the region had caused famine-scale food shortages. Thousands were dying every month and horrific images of starving children haunted nightly news broadcasts around the world.

The song soared up the charts as soon as it was released, juiced by a promotion hatched by Georgia DJs Bob Wolfe of WROM-AM and Don Briscar of WKCX-FM that brought it to a wide audience, including President Ronald Reagan aboard Air Force One.

English Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of Amanda Gorman’s The Hill We Climb

Narrated by Greg Cunningham

Our celebration of Black History Month continues into March with a video based on the JFY February podcast featuring an analysis of the poem The Hill We Climb presented by Amanda Gorman during the inauguration of President Joe Biden. It features Quincy College English Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of the rich allusions, references and wordplay woven into the texture of this densely patterned tapestry of spoken word. Professor Dooner, a teacher and performer of literature for over 30 years and a favorite among Quincy College students, teases out Ms. Gorman’s many evocations of the writings of African American poets, writers and leaders, a backdrop of reference that provided poignant and pointed context for the historic moment.

Pandemic politics and science denial: how to measure a year

by Greg Cunningham

Pandemic politics and science denial: how to measure a year

When the number came on the screen the song popped into my head:

Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes
Five hundred twenty-five thousand moments so dear
Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes
How do you measure? Measure a year?*

Except it wasn’t a Broadway revival. It was the latest death toll in the United States from the Coronavirus, and the number had just ticked past half a million people. We were only days away from the grimmest milestone imaginable: one person dead from Covid-19 every minute of every day. One death per minute for an entire year. How do you measure such a year?

Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of The Hill We Climb

Creating a patterned tapestry of the spoken word.

FEBRUARY 2021 PODCAST – Our celebration of Black History Month continues with today’s podcast featuring an analysis of the poem The Hill We Climb presented by Amanda Gorman during the inauguration of President Joe Biden. It features Quincy College English Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of the rich allusions, references and wordplay woven into the texture of this densely patterned tapestry of spoken word. Professor Dooner, a teacher and performer of literature for over 30 years and a favorite among Quincy College students, teases out Ms. Gorman’s many evocations of the writings of African American poets, writers and leaders, a backdrop of reference that provided poignant and pointed context for the historic moment.

Keeping in Touch Online. Progress, Not perfection

by Greg Cunningham

How teachers and students are making the virtual classroom work

“It doesn’t have to be perfect to be good.”

With this soothing mantra we began the first ever season of the Massachusetts Speech and Debate League during which all tournaments would be held online with students performing from home using video cameras. We quickly found that each tournament takes much more preparation than in-person tournaments, and nothing about them is easy. But something is preferable to nothing; and when students, coaches and league administrators work together, we know that even if the tournaments are not perfect, they provide an outlet for students to improve their public speaking skills and to craft and share their messages.