Donate to a Student Today

College and Career Readiness through Blended Learning

Civility

Philosophy in a Traffic Jam; Pondering Uncultured, Aggressive, Rude Behavior

Acrimony and outlandish behavior the new norm?

by Greg Cunningham, Blended Learning Specialist

Adults are not always on their best behavior. One need only drive on the Expressway during rush hour to confirm this truth. We do the best we can, especially around children, but sometimes we’re forced to explain the behavior of other adults who should absolutely know better.

The Way it Ought to Be… Have we lost the concept of civil discourse?

by Greg Cunningham, Blended Learning Specialist

It begins with the way we are teaching our children.

At the conclusion of his news broadcast on CBS each weekday evening, Walter Cronkite would shuffle the sheaf of papers on his anchor desk, raise his eyes to the camera, and deliver his signature sign-off: “And that’s the way it is.” It was one of the first consistent taglines on television. There have been others, such as Charles Osgood’s “See you on the radio” and “We’re in touch, so you be in touch” from ABC’s news magazine 20/20. Entertainment shows followed, like Carol Burnett’s famous ear tug, a secret message to her grandmother, and the current The View which asks us to “take a little time to enjoy the view.” Rachel Maddow thanks viewers for “joining us this hour” and Ellen DeGeneres implores them to “be kind to one another” when she signs off.

How to explain bad behavior to students

How to explain bad behavior to students

by Greg Cunningham, Blended Learning Specialist

These are difficult times for teachers. With MCAS looming, budgets due (and most likely cut from last year), and antsy students counting the hours to year-end, teachers have a small mountain of things on their plate. Add the storm of controversies in pop culture (which students pay more attention to than Algebra) and the classroom can be a complex and complicated storm center. Students who grew up listening to R. Kelly are going to have many questions even before getting to the recent revelations about Michael Jackson. And now English teachers have to confront the news that Charles Dickens tried to have his wife committed to an insane asylum so he could be with another woman. (Divorce was apparently too much trouble.) Throw in John Wayne’s recently rediscovered racist rants and Joe Biden’s hair fetish and your head spins like a scene from The Exorcist.

Tweet this: More #Civility is needed, abolish cyberbullying

by Greg Cunningham, JFYNetWorks Blended Learning Specialist

In 2010, Massachusetts passed an anti-bullying law that covered student actions and also mandated schools to have a plan in place to address such actions. The law includes cyber bullying, even if it takes place outside the school day. It has been an effective tool used by both parents and schools to reduce the amount of bullying that was often dismissed as “typical junior high or high school behavior.”

Digital Citizenship Curriculum

Tips for Building a Digital Citizenship Curriculum

by Michelle Ciccone | Blended Learning SPECIALIST

This year, JFYNetWorks worked with Revere High School to develop and implement a digital citizenship curriculum within the school’s civics class. Our blog post back in May explained why we believe it’s important for schools to address issues of digital citizenship. Digital citizenship includes a lot of really important things, like teaching students to vet and analyze information found on the Internet; to treat with respect other members of the online communities they take part in; and to use digital tools to actively engage with 21st century civic institutions. Schools consider numeracy and literacy essential to preparing young people for success in life. In our digital age, isn’t digital citizenship essential as well?