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College and Career Readiness through Blended Learning

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Free Online Academic Support For High School Students

Brought to you by JFYNetWorks and DESE

JFYNetWorks offers schools and districts an opportunity to provide high school students with standards-aligned online math and ELA instruction through a special initiative with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (announced in Commissioner Riley’s March 1 Weekly Update). The goal of this initiative is to help students reach grade-level skills, recover learning loss, and reduce achievement gaps. It begins now and continues through the summer and the 2021-22 school year.

There Comes a Time We Must Come Together, WE Are The World

by Greg Cunningham

The world must come together

“Check your egos at the door.”

This sign, inscribed by Quincy Jones, greeted 46 world-famous singers who showed up  at the A&M Studios in Los Angeles the night of January 28, 1985, to record We Are the World for USA For Africa to raise money for famine relief in Ethiopia. A drought of a magnitude never seen in the region had caused famine-scale food shortages. Thousands were dying every month and horrific images of starving children haunted nightly news broadcasts around the world.

The song soared up the charts as soon as it was released, juiced by a promotion hatched by Georgia DJs Bob Wolfe of WROM-AM and Don Briscar of WKCX-FM that brought it to a wide audience, including President Ronald Reagan aboard Air Force One.

Giving students a voice leads to engagement.

by Joan Reissman

As teachers, we want our students to get the most out of learning time. In order to learn, they need to be engaged. Making online lessons dynamic and giving students a chance to interact and have a voice are key elements in generating excitement about learning. Many free supplemental programs help make learning more engaging. This blog post will provide some tips and suggestions for quick tools a teacher can use to give students a voice and make the curriculum more dynamic. Of the many products on the market, I am highlighting tools that are easy to use and incorporate in lessons.

Celebrating Women Mathematicians during Women’s History Month

by Cathie Maglio

Since March is Women’s History Month, I thought it would be appropriate to recognize some women mathematicians who went against social norms and studied a “man’s” subject. I’m glad there were women brave enough to break down the barriers so that more women could enter STEM fields. I was surprised to find that women have actually been contributing to the field of mathematics since the 4th century. Here are some of them and their contributions to this field.

English Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of Amanda Gorman’s The Hill We Climb

Narrated by Greg Cunningham

Our celebration of Black History Month continues into March with a video based on the JFY February podcast featuring an analysis of the poem The Hill We Climb presented by Amanda Gorman during the inauguration of President Joe Biden. It features Quincy College English Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of the rich allusions, references and wordplay woven into the texture of this densely patterned tapestry of spoken word. Professor Dooner, a teacher and performer of literature for over 30 years and a favorite among Quincy College students, teases out Ms. Gorman’s many evocations of the writings of African American poets, writers and leaders, a backdrop of reference that provided poignant and pointed context for the historic moment.

Pandemic politics and science denial: how to measure a year

by Greg Cunningham

Pandemic politics and science denial: how to measure a year

When the number came on the screen the song popped into my head:

Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes
Five hundred twenty-five thousand moments so dear
Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes
How do you measure? Measure a year?*

Except it wasn’t a Broadway revival. It was the latest death toll in the United States from the Coronavirus, and the number had just ticked past half a million people. We were only days away from the grimmest milestone imaginable: one person dead from Covid-19 every minute of every day. One death per minute for an entire year. How do you measure such a year?

Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of The Hill We Climb

Creating a patterned tapestry of the spoken word.

FEBRUARY 2021 PODCAST – Our celebration of Black History Month continues with today’s podcast featuring an analysis of the poem The Hill We Climb presented by Amanda Gorman during the inauguration of President Joe Biden. It features Quincy College English Professor Steven Dooner’s analysis of the rich allusions, references and wordplay woven into the texture of this densely patterned tapestry of spoken word. Professor Dooner, a teacher and performer of literature for over 30 years and a favorite among Quincy College students, teases out Ms. Gorman’s many evocations of the writings of African American poets, writers and leaders, a backdrop of reference that provided poignant and pointed context for the historic moment.

William Monroe Trotter, The Boston Guardian

by Paula Paris

William Monroe Trotter 1872 – 1934

“For every right, with all the might”

(Motto of the Boston Guardian)

On Humboldt Avenue in Roxbury, Massachusetts, in the heart of what was once a thriving middle-class African-American residential and business neighborhood, sits the William Monroe Trotter K-8 School, one of two local tributes to its namesake. The other is the home Trotter once owned on Sawyer Avenue in Jones Hill, Dorchester, where he and his wife lived from 1899 to 1909 and which was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. Boston-bred Trotter was a major civil rights activist and journalist in the early twentieth century, whose legacy has largely faded away. There are no monuments preserving his likeness.