Donate to a Student Today

College and Career Readiness through Blended Learning

Search

mcas - search results

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search

Lynn English

Published  April 10 2014 in CommonWealth Magazine

Another approach to college readiness gap
Assessment and instruction are key
by Gary Kaplan

ON A VISIT to Massachusetts last month, US Education Secretary Arne Duncan cautioned against resting on our laurels. Despite the Bay State’s nation-leading test scores, he chided, “Four in ten of your high school graduates aren’t ready for college. Forty percent are taking remedial classes. That’s a staggering number.”

The secretary didn’t quite have his facts right. Four of every ten students entering public colleges and universities in Massachusetts aren’t ready for the course work and require remedial classes. The number for community colleges alone is even higher: 65 percent of students entering the two-year colleges need to take remedial math.

But Duncan needn’t have worried about complacency in the Commonwealth. Even as he scolded, Commissioner of Higher Education Richard Freeland was wrapping up his critique of remedial education for the spring issue of CommonWealth magazine. In his article, the commissioner gives a thorough review of the importance of public higher education as the workforce pipeline of our skill-based economy; and he zeroes in on developmental education—especially the 65 percent rate at the community college level – as the bottleneck at the mouth of that pipeline.

College Readiness for a Competitive Workforce

JFYNetWorks Helping to Bridge the GAP to College and Career

DESE Commissioner’s weekly update:

JFYNetWorks receives $1 mm grant for statewide college readiness program

JFYNetWorks (formerly Jobs for Youth) has received a $1 million grant to establish collaborative partnerships between high schools and community colleges.  JFYNetWorks will set up and manage Accuplacer preparation programs in high schools to accelerate and encourage enrollment into credit-bearing courses at community colleges and other colleges and universities. Interested high schools and community colleges should contact JFYNetWorks Executive Director Gary Kaplan at (617) 338-0815, ext. 224 or go to http://www.JFYBoston.org.

0 2379

Culture, Counter-culture, Disruptive Innovation, Coup d’ecole

JFYNetWorks towards Success

School reform is typically approached as an all-encompassing top-down restructuring. Though it makes sense, from a planning point of view, to take a comprehensive approach, such an approach can take a long time to implement and often spurs opposition, resentment, and even sabotage. An ingrained culture cannot be changed all at once, even with strong top-down control. However, it is possible to seed a counter-culture of high achievement within a larger culture of low achievement: to build new behaviors up from below while top-down mandates are taking effect.