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College and Career Readiness through Blended Learning

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JFYNet reflects on new normal

JFYNet Remote Learning Specialists mull over the New Normal

by Greg, Eileen, Cathie and Joan

Greg Cunningham

On March 16th, the world stopped. Or so it seemed. Restaurants closed, office workers were told to work from home, and going to the grocery store felt like a sequel to The Hunger Games. (I distinctly remember a woman in the deli yelling “I volunteer as tribute” when her number was called.) We were all instructed to stay home where we quickly discovered that Zoom was not just the name of a vintage PBS TV show.

Sheltered English Immersion (SEI)

by Greg Cunningham, Blended Learning Specialist

In this tutorial, we review how our reading program can help teachers of EL students implement effective SEI strategies in the classroom or remotely. Software provided by JFYNetWorks integrates seamlessly whether students are working remotely, in person in the classroom, or in a hybrid learning model shifting between remote and classroom.

Summer Study will Give You a Jump On the Fall

A Fall Payoff with Summer Study

Summer is usually a time for students to relax and hang with friends. But a little bit of study this summer will lead to big payoffs in the fall. All students already enrolled in JFYNet software may continue using the software all summer, and new students are invited to enroll. This video provides online options and suggestions for summer study, and information as to why, due to the Covid-19 school shutdown, summer study is more important now than ever.

Once an at-risk student himself, Jorge Santana leads his students towards success at PACE

Once an at-risk student, Jorge Santana now leads students towards success

JUNE 2020 PODCAST – This month’s podcast features Jorge Santana, the Executive Director of the PACE Career Academy Charter School in Pembroke, New Hampshire, a JFYNet partner school. In this episode, you’ll hear how Mr. Santana was an at-risk student while growing up, worked early in his career to find systemic solutions to help students connect with mentors, and how PACE Academy works with students who are considered at risk and struggle with education due to other factors in their lives. We also hear two current students at PACE Academy discuss how they have found success with the help of Mr. Santana and all the staff members at PACE.

Specialists’ messages to the 2020 graduates

Hats off to the Class of 2020

from Cathie, Eileen, Joan and Greg

Cathie

When I graduated from high school, our class motto was “At this peak we begin climbing.” My message to this year’s graduates is, You have climbed the peak! Congratulations! As you stand there, you look back to your high school days and ahead to all that is before you. This is not the only peak you will climb in your life. You will pass through some valleys, and you will ascend other peaks. Cherish your time in the valleys. It is there that you grow, learn things about yourself, and gain strength to conquer the next peak. As you prepare for that next climb, I wish you a smooth ascent and a beautiful view from the top!

Cracks in the Bedrock, The destabilizing effects of inequality

by Gary Kaplan

History doesn’t repeat itself, Mark Twain observed, but it often rhymes.

Because of our peculiar history, the current calls for redirection of police funding to social programs fall with a familiar cadence at JFYNetWorks.

We are often asked what JFY stands for. It stands for Jobs For Youth, the original name of the nonprofit organization. Jobs For Youth was founded in 1976 with a Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention grant from the US Department of Justice. Our original mission was to help high school dropouts find jobs. Low-income youth were dropping out of high school at rates rising toward 20% nationally and 40% in the cities. In the early 1970s the Nixon Administration, predating Reagan, thought the best social program was a job. And so, our history began as a juvenile justice delinquency prevention program.

Remote doesn’t have to mean impersonal

by Gary Kaplan

Online communication has been with us since May 24, 1844, when Samuel F.B. Morse tapped out his first dots and dashes. Thirty-two years later, in Boston, Alexander Graham Bell summoned Mr. Watson with the first voice message carried over an electrical wire. Western Union transmitted a halftone photograph in 1921, and in 1927 Philo Farnsworth beamed the first live TV image. The cornerstones of online communication were in place. These founding fathers would be astonished at the ceaseless cacophony of voice, image and text that blankets the globe today in an impenetrable electronic cocoon.

Teachers: Impact of COVID-19 on Daily Activities, Students and More

Teacher Perspectives: Shifting to Remote & Distance Learning

MAY 2020 PODCAST – This podcast features educators from Durfee High School in Fall River, Mindess Elementary School in Ashland, and Newton South High School discussing how the shift to remote learning due to the Covid-19 shutdown has impacted daily schedules, allowed some students to thrive, thrown other students off stride, and may create a “new normal” for education in the future.

Button, Button, Don’t Push My Button

“YOU’RE ON MUTE!”

by Greg Cunningham, Remote Learning Specialist

According to Merriam-Webster, some of the most popular words of 2019 were crawdad (aquatic animal that looks like a small lobster and lives in rivers and streams), snitty (disagreeably ill-tempered), and tergiversation (evasion of straightforward action or clear-cut statement).

I’m betting the most popular word of 2020 will be mute, as in “WE CAN’T HEAR YOU–YOU’RE ON MUTE!” Or “CAN YOU MUTE SO THE REST OF US DON’T HAVE TO LISTEN TO YOUR YAPPY DOG DURING THIS MEETING?” I use the word at least five times a day.

Im[pact of school shutdown. a student perspective

Student Perspectives: Effect on Educational Programs

APRIL 2020 PODCAST – Our April podcast features students from Needham High School, Durfee High School in Fall River, Bridgewater State University and UMass Amherst as they discuss how the statewide school shutdown has affected their educational programs, their extracurricular activities, and how the Covid-19 virus may create a “new normal” in the future.