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College and Career Readiness through Blended Learning

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You Never Know What the Future Holds!

Be It Chance or By Design, You Sometimes Never Know What the Future Holds For You!

by Cathie Maglio, Blended Learning SPECIALIST

I was in a school library recently when a student came in to take a make up test. His teacher said to me that this student had just received a scholarship to play football at a nearby college. This student never expected to go to college. He did just enough to get by during his junior year and was thinking about going into the military. Now, with the scholarship in hand, he is getting serious about school and doing his work, not to just get by, but to succeed!

This student’s story got me thinking. In my travels as a blended learning specialist at JFYNetWorks, I see so many students who just want to do the minimum or less in school and never think about what the future holds for them. The choices these students make now could affect the opportunities that await them as they get on with life. They never think that an opportunity for them might be right around the corner and they may miss it because of their lack of motivation.

A ‘Graduation Walk’ Not Taken

A ‘Graduation Walk’ Not Taken

by Cathie Maglio, Blended Learning SPECIALIST
I heard a story today that made me sad. It prompted me to think about the complex relationship between schools and students and life.

A member of the senior class at this high school has told his teachers, guidance counselors and administrators that he intends to fail all his classes. He does not want to “walk” to get his diploma with the rest of his class. He plans to go to summer school to make up the classes he failed and get his diploma at the end of the summer. He comes to school and attends classes but he does no work. He has his plan and he’s sticking to it.

Education, Training and Career Plan

2/29/16 – Boston Globe published a letter to its editor by Gary Kaplan, Executive Director of JFYNetWorks and David Driscoll, former Massachusetts Commissioner of Education in response to the 2/17/16 piece ‘As boomers retire, growth may slow’ by Deirdre Fernandes.

Mr. Kaplan and Mr. Driscoll’s published response found here.

Your article “As boomers retire, growth may slow” (2/17/16) warns that a shrinking labor force depleted by massive retirements will cut our economic growth rate in half. The key sentence, “A dwindling labor force can mean flagging growth…fewer jobs, lower incomes, and less tax revenue…” threatens that even those who are still working will feel the bite of economic contraction. What is the solution for “a state and region whose main competitive advantage is a skilled and educated workforce?”

Every Student Succeeds Act needs EdTech to close Achievement Gaps

by Gary Kaplan, JFYNetWorks Executive Director

The new federal education law, the “Every Student Succeeds Act,” reverses 15 years of movement toward national standards and assessments with a Jeffersonian devolution of power to the states. The federal retreat had already been well underway as state after state abandoned the two national testing consortia and some repudiated the Common Core curriculum standards. Now that the federal government has finalized the return to state control over educational standards—the status quo ante No Child Left Behind– perhaps attention can be focused on the underlying issue: how to close the persistent gaps in international rankings, college readiness and minority achievement that still blemish the nation’s report card.

$1 Million of College Savings for Students

One million dollars.

That’s how much JFYNetWorks has saved college-bound students.

How? By helping them build the skills to meet college entry requirements. Our high school-based blended learning programs have helped thousands of students improve their skills and eliminate over 2000 remedial college courses. The savings in tuition and fees have now passed the one million dollar mark.

A million dollars. The idea has deep American resonance. No amount of inflation can dim the luster of its gold-rush gleam.

Today’s gold rush is college. A two-year degree is worth $300,000 more in lifetime earnings than a high school diploma. A four-year degree gains $800,000.

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GivingTuesday Save the Date

#GivingTuesday JFYNetWorks

#GivingTuesday – Join Us For a Global Celebration of Generosity

On Tuesday, December 1, 2015, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

College is not just an option anymore—it is a necessity. College graduates get hired more easily and earn much more than non-graduates. The gap has been widening for decades with the college advantage trending steadily upward. Within a few years, over 70% of jobs will require at least a two-year degree.

JFYNetWorks has the online blended learning tools to better prepare our high school students for college Readiness.

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'Pre-medial' Education: Heading Off the Need for Remedial Coursework in College

This piece was originally published on EDWeek.com’s Blog 11/6/15
By guest blogger Caralee J. Adams

Washington

High School Principal Damon Smith feels responsible for his graduates beyond the time they leave his building. And he doesn’t want the likelihood of their success in higher education to be a mystery until they take a placement test the fall of their freshman year in college.

At Cambridge Rindge and Latin School in Cambridge, Mass., teachers and counselors look closely at students whose test scores and grades as underclassmen indicate they might not be on track. Then, in 11th or 12th grades they are given the ACCUPLACER tests that community colleges use to gauge readiness for college-level work in math, reading, and writing.